Categorystuff

Irish Green Ink

Leaf and I got another bottle of ink! She says I have a problem, but I don’t think I’m completely alone — we’re enablers for each other. Maybe me more than Leaf but still! :)

Montblanc Irish Green

This is Montblanc Irish Green. The lightings a little yellow because I took the photo at night. But it’s basically a beautiful green. Writes well, reasonably flowy, some shading, well behaved; I really don’t have anything bad to say about it. I suppose if you want sheen on your ink, or permanence, it’s not the one for that, but otherwise, nice ink. Nice bottle too!

We got it at Fahrney’s Pens. If you’re ever in DC, and you want some Montblanc ink, Fahrney’s is the place to go. They have every color for a reasonable price. Also, just going into the store is nice. Lots of pens, lots of inks! They were having a small pen show at their store the day after we went, but we weren’t in DC so we didn’t go. Just as well, we would’ve probably picked up more stuff. :)

Speaking of Pencils

As promised, here are my pencil comparisons:

Hardness

These are samples for three different Dixon Ticonderogas, a 3 (Hard), 2 5/10 (medium), and #2 (soft, HB) in my Field Notes notebook. I tried to write my regular style with each pencil, but of course I am not an automaton and this is imperfect. But you can see how much darker the soft is versus the hard. The thing is though, I kind of think the hard is too light and sort of scratchy. I’ve had to sharpen the #2 more though, and it breaks more easily. I started them both about the same time, but the 2 pencil is definitely shorter already. 2.5 seems like the Goldilocks choice — just right. Not that I would turn down a nice HB/2 pencil, and they are the easiest to find, usually.

AND! The Well-Appointed Desk just did a whole post about this, with way more information! I didn’t even know F was #2.5, even though I just got done saying that it was my fave. Pencil noob.

Also, this is like a crazy theme this week, where I post a few words about something, but then someone more knowledgeable and internet-famous posts way more in depth words about the topic.

I Like Pencils, Too

I don’t just use fountain pens! Actually, I try not to use fountain pens on my everyday carry notebook — the Field Notes — because of the aforementioned show through. Sometimes, I don’t use a pen at all.
Smells of nostalgia
So much nostalgia. I like the color! I like the sharpening! Aren’t the shavings pretty? And I love the smell. Actually, sometimes, I catch myself sniffing at my pencil at work. I’m embarrassing. I don’t know if it’s particular to these Dixon Ticonderoga pencils, or if lots of pencils have a nice wood smell, but I do know I don’t want a pencil that doesn’t have some kind of wood smell.

The shavings are from a Medium 2.5 pencil — just slightly harder than the standard #2 pencils we used to use in school for tests. Harder is nicer for notes because it stays sharper for longer, and 2.5 is still soft enough to show up nicely, usually. Although I do like the softness and darkness of a standard #2 HB pencil. It’s a tough decision. I should probably do a side by side comparison of the #2 and #2.5 pencils.

I kind of want to try another pencil, but I haven’t decided what. Definitely not mechanical. Taking recommendations for nice wooden pencils! Or I might just stick with these, ’cause they’re pretty much alright.

New Flickr App

Flickr 3.0 just got released today. So far I like it! Seems faster and better! The interface looks nicer, too. But you know one thing they didn’t fix? It doesn’t do upside down orientation. I know, I know, who cares, right? But I do. Sometimes I use my iPad or iPhone upside down. Like when I’m charging it but the cord is just a little too short, for example. And then if I try to look at photos on Flickr, it’s annoying. But that’s still not a downgrade from the previous app, because version 2 also didn’t do upside down at all. So at worst you get a better app that just still doesn’t turn.

Edited to add: Shawn Blanc just posted his review of Flickr 3.0 and it’s way complete and full of information where mine isn’t! In case you’re interested in an actual review with information. And pictures. :)

Sheaffer pen, Skrip blue, Field Notes Pitch Black

John gave me an old fountain pen he had that he’d used in school back in the day (ha!). I don’t know the model, just the brand Sheaffer and that it has a nib labeled M and Made in the USA.
Unidentified Sheaffer fountain pen

So I bought some Sheaffer Skrip cartridges for it and installed the blue one.
Writing sample
That’s it on my Field Notes Pitch Black notebook. I kept spelling Sheaffer wrong here and also I clearly don’t know how to spell unidentified. Grr.

Field Notes isn’t really a notebook that I use a fountain pen with much. Usually I use a pencil (currently a Dixon Ticonderoga 1388 – 2.5 Medium which I think are available everywhere) or a Pilot Hi-Tec-C or any ol’ pen or pencil really. I like the Field Notes, and especially love this Pitch Black edition because while I like blank pages for journaling, I love dot grid for my daily pocket notebook. The dots here are perfect, not too dark. Also like the black cover and the black staples. It’s about the details you know?

Here’s why I don’t use fountain pen, especially not fountain pens with M nibs. Actually it’s not so much better with a Japanese F nib, so really just this Field Notes edition isn’t suited really. (Actually most editions of Field Notes aren’t.) The problem is show through.
Bleed through
Not that that stops me from using fountain pens with it.

For comparison, here’s the same pen on the Miquelrius notebook. There was no show through.
Sheaffer pen on miquelrius notebook

I like the blue ink actually, more than I thought I would — sometimes blues and blacks can be somewhat boring. But when I’m done with this cartridge, I just don’t see myself going out to pick up a bottle of Sheaffer Skrip blue. I don’t know, it’s fine, but I don’t feel LOVE. It’s possible though, that I just won’t ever feel love for a blue ink.

Journal

Leaf inspired me to start journaling a bit. Actually, it mostly just means I buy notebooks that are around 5×7 (A5 equivalent?) that are blank and blather all over it. Sometimes I write random quotes or whatever just to practice handwriting.

I just bought a random Miquerius Flexible journal. It’s 100 blank pages, but it doesn’t stay open by itself which is my preference. Paper seems nice though. Miquelrius flexible journal paper, Diamine Evergreen, TWSBI Mini 1.1mm stub
Doesn’t look like it feathers, and I can use both sides of the paper. I like the elastic that keeps it closed. I think I like notebooks even more when it’s not necessary, but either way.

Still I’m going to buy something else for when I’m done with this one. I think I’d like a hardcover journal that’ll stay open. Also, if possible, I’d like it to have a pretty cover. :)

More Pens!

As long as I’m talking about pens and inks, I have a couple of other ones, too.

That’s my TWSBI Diamond Mini still inked with Diamine Evergreen, same as the previous post. Then a Pilot 78g with a fine nib inked with Waterman Tender Purple. Last one is a Pilot 78g broad nib (but more of a stub) with Pilot Blue Black ink. I like the Pilot 78g, especially around $10, but the converter for refilling ink is really just okay. And using cartridges, which is pretty much the only other option, isn’t half as nice, plus the ink choices are fewer. The ink reservoir and piston mechanism in my TWSBI is much better. Overall, I’d rather get another TWSBI, although I suppose if I lose a 78g I would be less upset. You could spend a lot more on pens, but I think I personally would rather not. I am eying more ink though. :)

The notebook is a small Rhodia notebook with graph rule. It’s a little bit too small, but not bad. I don’t love graph though, blank or dots are my preference. Paper’s excellent of course.

Edit:
I messed up the picture! The pens aren’t lined up by what I wrote; I switched the 2nd and third pens. The one in the middle is the Pilot 78g fine and the one below is Pilot 78g broad.

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